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Buckel Family Wine

Around Crested Butte & Colorado

Having first met in Crested Butte, fallen in love in Colorado, and cultivated our passion for making really good wine here in Colorado, there’s no place we’d rather be. There’s something about this land, the people, and the way time passes here. You can see it in the vibrant sunsets, draping the sandstone cliffs that tower over the Western Slope’s orchards and vineyards, feel it while shaking hands and exchanging laughs with a farmer as you load up the season’s harvest, and taste it while taking that first sip of a new vintage, as fall’s cooler air funnels into the valley and golden aspens glow in the low-angled afternoon sun.

Colorado is truly a special place, and we aim to share as much of it with you as possible. From the terroir, to the history, and the adventures that await, come back here often for our family’s favorites of Colorado and Crested Butte.

 

 

Family Buckel
 
March 18, 2020 | Family Buckel

Keeping the Soul of our Valley alive!

This is shaping up to be a tough month for our little valley in the West Elk Mountains of Colorado.  One of the most profitable months for our businesses in the winter was cut short by a global pandemic.  We have been impacted further by the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our community.  We are a hot spot in CO.  

Lately in the news, I am seeing CEO’s from across the nation lineup in Washington with hats in hand looking for free or no interest money.  Again, we are back to the “too big to fail”.  Back to the soulless corporations lining their pockets so their executives can maintain their oversized pay packages.  Historically, our leaders have relied on giving money to the top, in the hope it trickles down through our economic system.  This has been an inefficient solution at best.

What about the Soul of small communities?  Back to our little valley, missing out on a profitable month can make or break a small business.  And what about the employees that cannot be retained?  We have already had the soul of our valley chipped away at by rising home prices and rent, and not a lot of high paying jobs to match.  The current climate will only exacerbate our situation.  We are seeing a lot of our small business do anything they can to stay open, keep a couple employees on, provide a few services.  Basically, try to stay alive and survive!

 

THIS IS A CALL TO ARMS!  Get out and support YOUR small local businesses!  Order a lunch or dinner.  Try to find your goods and services locally.  And of course get a bottle of wine to create a relaxing moment in these stressful times.  I want to see the diversity of our community and communities across the country remain intact and healthy.  As a small community let’s support each other with the intention of building tighter bonds and feeding our Soul!

Time Posted: Mar 18, 2020 at 9:36 AM
Family Buckel
 
March 15, 2020 | Family Buckel

What is a Pet-Nat?

    Ever wonder what makes your wine sparkling? There are a number of different methods that producers use to create the bubbles. Champagne is made by using the Méthode Traditionelle, in which a dry, still wine gets an addition of sugar and yeast and is bottled. This causes a second fermentation inside of the bottle, thus creating bubbles. Prosecco is produced with the Charmat method, where dry, still wine gets the addition of yeast and sugar and is left in a pressure ready tank. The second fermentation happens inside of this tank, which traps all of the bubbles, and is then bottled. Another way of making sparkling wine is to pump CO2 directly into still wine to achieve a bubbling beverage. 

    But the oldest and perhaps simplest way of creating sparkling wine is the Méthode Ancestrale, or pétillant naturel (pét-nat) style. To make a pét-nat, we simply bottle a wine before it has finished fermenting. The residual sugar in the wine ferments in bottle, creating light, natural bubbles. 

    Similar to méthode traditionelle, because the wine has fermented in the bottle, we are left with sediment in the bottom as a result. By AOC rules, for Champagnes this sediment must be removed. In order to achieve this, winemakers put the bottles in riddling racks, which hold the bottles upside down, so that the yeast falls into the cap and neck of the bottle. Next, the bottleneck is frozen to trap that sediment into a plug of frozen wine. Winemakers then disgorge; they uncap the bottle and let the frozen plug fly out, leaving a clean bottle of bubbly wine left. Wine and sometimes a little sugar is then added back to the bottle before it is finally corked and caged. 

    Not all Pét-Nat wines have to go through this disgorging process, and many producers prefer not to, as they enjoy the natural style of the wine with sediment. While some may be weary of sediment and cloudiness in a wine, others enjoy the added mouthfeel and rustic character. 

    This past harvest season, we bottled a portion of our Syrah rosé before it had finished fermenting to create a pét-nat style wine. Our bottles have all fermented creating a nice bubbly wine. We’ve turned all of our bottles upside down in order to catch the sediment in the cap, and we have decided to disgorge the bottles in order to achieve a cleaner style sparkling. Soon, we will create ice baths, plunge the bottles, and have a messy day of popping bottles. This spring you will be able to enjoy our Syrah Rosé pét-nat and pop some bottles yourselves!

Time Posted: Mar 15, 2020 at 9:00 AM