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Buckel Family Wine

Around Crested Butte & Colorado

Having first met in Crested Butte, fallen in love in Colorado, and cultivated our passion for making really good wine here in Colorado, there’s no place we’d rather be. There’s something about this land, the people, and the way time passes here. You can see it in the vibrant sunsets, draping the sandstone cliffs that tower over the Western Slope’s orchards and vineyards, feel it while shaking hands and exchanging laughs with a farmer as you load up the season’s harvest, and taste it while taking that first sip of a new vintage, as fall’s cooler air funnels into the valley and golden aspens glow in the low-angled afternoon sun.

Colorado is truly a special place, and we aim to share as much of it with you as possible. From the terroir, to the history, and the adventures that await, come back here often for our family’s favorites of Colorado and Crested Butte.

 

 

Family Buckel
 
February 28, 2020 | Family Buckel

March Events

Unfortunately due to COVID19 our March events have been cancelled as of Friday March 13th. Check back for events in later spring or summer.

For this month, we have a variety of events happening around Colorado. 

Saturday March 7th, Basecamp Tasting. For folks in the Summit County area, head on over to Basecamp Wine and Spirits for an in-store tasting. 

4-7pm @ Basecamp Wine & Spirits, 223 Lusher Ct #1, Frisco, CO 80443

Click here for more information on Basecamp Wine & Spirits free tastings. https://basecampliquors.com/free-tastings/

Tuesday March 10th, Professional Women’s Network. Join us at the Urban Market in Durango for a women’s networking event. This is an opportunity to connect with fellow community members and to inspire growth in each other’s professional and personal lives. Tickets are $10 for PWN members and $20 for nonmembers, and can be purchased at the door. A portion of the proceeds go to the Women’s Resource Center!

5:00 PM to 6:30 PM @ Urban Market, 865 Main Ave, Durango

For more information and to get tickets: Women's Resource Center Durango http://wrcdurango.org/events/womens-history-month/pwn-event/

Wednesday, March 11th, Winemaker Dinner. The Palisade Café 11.0 will be hosting a multi-course meal, each paired with one of our delicious wines. Our winemaker, Joe Buckel, will be there to mingle and talk about our wines while Chef John Sabal serves up delicious food. This dinner is described as an intimate, relaxed, unpretentious, country casual event. Seats are limited, so go ahead and register now!

Doors open at 5:30pm @ The Palisade Café 11.0, 113 W 3rd St, Palisade, CO 81526

 Click Here to register for this event. https://www.palisadecafe11.com/events-1/winemaker-dinner-5-buckel-family-wine

Friday, March 13th, Gunnison Valley Health Gala. The Gunnison Valley Health Foundation is hosting its Inaugural Gala event to honor Tough Enough to Wear Pink. Renowned Chef Jason Vernon of Speckled Goose Culinary will be serving a four-course menu paired with our fine wines to create a not-to-be-missed dinner. In addition, there will be live music and entertainment to bring you a fun filled evening. 

6-10:30pm @ Center for the Arts Crested Butte, 606 6th St, Crested Butte, CO 81224

Purchase tickets here. https://www.gunnisonvalleyhealth.org/Events-Calendar/Event-Details.aspx?Event=56

Saturday, March 14th Science of Winemaking. Join us at the winery for part two of our winemaking courses through the Center for the Arts Crested Butte. Here we will guide you through the basic science behind the winemaking process, from testing grapes, juice and wine, to fermentation, equipment and corking. This will be a fun and interactive class whether you are wanting to know the basics of how wine is made or if you make wine at home and want to grow your knowledge. This event includes light hors d’oeuvres, and plenty of our delicious wine for you to taste.

3-5pm @ Buckel Family Wine, 1018 Hwy 135, Unit B, Gunnison, CO 81230

To register for the class, click here https://www.crestedbuttearts.org/The-Art-Science-of-Winemaking-Series

Tuesday, March 31st EAT Colorado Food Show. This event brings innovative Colorado food and beverage producers together with the buyers from restaurants, caterers, grocers, distributors, hospitals, municipalities, and school systems to foster a greater connection and understanding of our dynamic food system. We will be showing our fine wines along with many other producers of wine, beer, spirits, produce, grains, meats, preserves, condiments, honey, baked goods, and more. There will be a speaker series in addition, to provide further information on current Colorado food topics. 

11am-3pm @ National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt Street Denver, CO 80216

Registration and more information https://eatcolorado.org/


 

Time Posted: Feb 28, 2020 at 3:47 PM
Family Buckel
 
February 26, 2020 | Family Buckel

Why is my white wine cloudy?

Have you ever gone home with a clear bottle of white wine, popped it in the fridge, and then noticed crystals in the bottom of the bottle or in your glass? Those are formed by tartaric acid, which naturally occurs in grapes. These tartrate crystals can form after the wine ferments and if the wine becomes oversaturated with tartaric acid. The excess acid is suspended in the wine, and can then form crystals and drop out. These tartrate crystals are not harmful to consume, however they are not exactly desirable. 

Another issue that can arise with these wines is heat instability. A seemingly clear bottle of wine can turn hazy when exposed to higher heat. For instance, you might go to a winery and buy a nice clear bottle of white wine, and store it in your trunk while you head out for a bike ride. If it’s a summer day and your car gets hot, you could come back to find a now cloudy bottle of wine. This heat instability is due to the naturally occuring proteins in grapes, and some have significantly more than others.

In order to avoid these outcomes, we at Buckel Family Wine will put our white and rose wines through cold and heat stabilization. To cold stabilize the wine, it is as simple as cooling the wine tank down to about 30 degrees (F). The tartrate crystals will form in the tank and fall to the bottom, and deposit around the sides of the tank. To heat stabilize the wine, we use Bentonite (which is a clay substance) to bind to the proteins that can cause the cloudiness. This will also then fall to the bottom of the tank, and we are left with clean, stable wine. 

    At that point, we will be about ready to bottle the wines, just after sending them through a filtering process to ensure they are fully stable and clean wines, and that there will be no issues that arise once they are in the bottle. Our goal is to deliver wines that are expressive and natural. Therefore, we only do as much as needed to deliver quality, while making sure these wines don’t lose what makes them unique.

 

Time Posted: Feb 26, 2020 at 1:20 PM
Family Buckel
 
February 1, 2020 | Family Buckel

2020 VinCO

The 2020 Colorado wine conference featured speakers who offered information on a variety of winemaking and grape growing topics and techniques. From how yeast exactly works to wine flaws and faults, to how to make sparkling wine via the Charmat method, there was plenty of knowledge to absorb. The wonderful thing about winemaking is that there are so many variations in the process that affect your end product and display your style. Here at Buckel Family Wine, we believe in making old-world style wines that are able to show the true character of the grape and of the terroir. We achieve this by using minimal intervention in the winemaking process, meaning less additives and no filtering for our red wines. 

One process that most people are familiar with however is barrel aging. Tim Donahue, Executive Director of the Institute for Enology and Viticulture at Walla Walla Community College in Washington State presented on the the influence of oak in winemaking. He explained the barrel making process from oak seedling to finished product (which takes a long time as you could imagine), and how barrels can be used to benefit your wine.

Specific species of oak trees are grown in different geographic areas, resulting in varying characteristics that they impart on the wine.The biggest difference is between French (or European) oak and American oak. These types of oak can influence wines quite differently, usually the French being more subtle and spicy and the American being more bold with notes of coconut. Once the oak is harvested, it is cut into staves and left outside to cure for up to two years. Once cured, the staves are assembled into the beginnings of a barrel and are then toasted. The toasting process is another key component of how the barrel influences the wine. The heavier the toast, the more intense the barrel imparts flavors on the wine. In their early years, barrels impart a stronger influence in the wine’s flavor profile. After a few years, the intensity of the oak dissipates. For bolder wines, one might choose a newer barrel. For more delicate, subtle wines, one might opt for an older barrel.

    For our wines, we choose French oak barrels that have already seen a few years of use. This allows us to age our wines for up to 18 months without overpowering the wine’s inherent flavor profile, and allows the oak to gently smooth out the tannins over time. We end up with a wine that has balanced characteristics and is ready to drink or age gracefully in bottle. Upon receiving barrels new to us, we make sure to take good care of them so that we can use them well. This means cleaning, rehydrating, tightening up the leakers. Once the barrels are full of wine, we check on them and top them up regularly to prevent space for oxidation or for unwanted yeast/bacteria to take over. 

 

Time Posted: Feb 1, 2020 at 1:18 PM