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Buckel Family Wine

Around Crested Butte & Colorado

Having first met in Crested Butte, fallen in love in Colorado, and cultivated our passion for making really good wine here in Colorado, there’s no place we’d rather be. There’s something about this land, the people, and the way time passes here. You can see it in the vibrant sunsets, draping the sandstone cliffs that tower over the Western Slope’s orchards and vineyards, feel it while shaking hands and exchanging laughs with a farmer as you load up the season’s harvest, and taste it while taking that first sip of a new vintage, as fall’s cooler air funnels into the valley and golden aspens glow in the low-angled afternoon sun.

Colorado is truly a special place, and we aim to share as much of it with you as possible. From the terroir, to the history, and the adventures that await, come back here often for our family’s favorites of Colorado and Crested Butte.

 

 

Joe Buckel
 
May 6, 2020 | Joe Buckel

How wine gets it's color

How wine gets its color?

Here we share insider knowledge on how wine is made. The intricacies of blending science and art to build craft wines that are true expression of the terroir and grape varietal. We understand from drinking wine that there is significant differences between a Cabernet Franc and Pinot Noir, just as there are differences between a red delicious and a pink lady apple. 
 
Once the grapes are harvested and tossed into the wine making process, decisions about the final product begin to be considered. Color is one aspect that a winemaker can control, through grape choice as well as a technique called maceration. By definition,   maceration refers to the contact between juice and berry skins. During the fermentation process of Red Wines, winemakers can choose to shorten or lengthen the period in which the grape skins are left to sit with the grape juice. This maceration period will impact the final color of the wine.
 
The juice that is in contact with the skins extracts Polyphenols.  The skins of grapes contain these Polyphenols, which create the color and tannins in wine.  The more time the fermenting juice has contact with the skins the more color a red wine will gain, this contact time will add more tannins (structure) to the wine.  Maceration is  typically done during the Alcoholic Fermentation.
 
There are a couple of techniques used during maceration that help extract Polyphenols.  One technique winemakers use is called a Cold Soak.  This style of maceration is executed previous to the Alcoholic Fermentation and usually at colder temperatures to slow the start of Alcoholic Fermentation.  From my experience, the Cold Soak enhances the color of a wine with out too much tannin extraction. This limits bitterness in the wine.
 
Another method used by winemakers is called Extended Maceration.  This maceration happens after alcoholic fermentation.  In this style, the finished wine can stay on the skins and seeds for up to 2 months.  This approach increases in tannins(bitterness), which ultimately sets up the wine for extended aging.  Sometimes this process also causes the wine to be lighter in color. Extended Maceration is typically executed in aged red wines. These red wines that are built to drink better with age, say 15+ years.
 
Maceration techniques have become more popular with white wines, which allows white wines to become more tannic. 

Grape Maceration

Time Posted: May 6, 2020 at 9:23 AM
Buckel Family
 
April 19, 2020 | Buckel Family

Rosé all day!

ROSÉ - Today April 20th

Rosé all day!  Rosé has been around since the beginning of wine.  In those times, red and white wine were made in fresher style with less skin contact to accent fruitiness.  Hence, the red wines looked like Rosé!  More skin contact gives red wine its darker color and tannin.  The color of Rosé depends on how long the juice is in contact with the skins of the red grapes.  Less contact and you have a beautiful light peach color.  More contact and it starts turning pink, a bit more and you start to get a light red wine.  It’s really fun is when a rusty colored grape like Pinot Gris is used, the skin contact with the juice  developes into an orange wine.

Rosé has seen a grand resurgence in the last decade.  Moving away from the sweet style of White Zin and all the replicas known as ‘Blush’ that were made in the 70’s and 80’s out of California.  These days, Rosé is presented in a drier version expressing the delicate nuance of the fruit used, which I must say is, much more preferred.  Some of these are sparkling too!

How is Rosé made? There are 3 ways to make Rosé.  The majority is produced using red grapes with little or no skin contact, Maceration, to keep wine lighter in color.  This is the classic method for areas like Provence and the Loire in France, and of course, Buckel Family Wine in Colorado.  Sometimes red grapes will be put in a fermenter(juice, skins and all) where the slightly colored juice is drained off and fermented, this method is called Saignée, ‘bleeding’ in French.  Lastly, white and red wine can be Blended to create a ‘pink’ wine.  This method is not used so much, except for Champagne.  Bubbles!

Let’s have a glass!  The flavor most associated with Rosé is strawberry, lovely!  There can also be some other delicate flavors of tart cherry, melon, rose petal, hibiscus and citrus.  Rosé can also show the much argued over term, minerality and have some green flavors like chard or rhubarb.  What should we eat with Rosé?   Well the French nailed this one pairing it with bouillabaisse, a mediterranean fish stew including shellfish and Provençal herbs that originated in Marseille.  Other Rosé pairings include, spring peas, asparagus, ham, roast chicken, salads, stone crabs, fish, cheese, turkey, pizza, french fries and doughnuts!  Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Rosé with about any food or on its own.  Rosé all day!

 

Time Posted: Apr 19, 2020 at 4:35 PM
Buckel Family
 
March 15, 2020 | Buckel Family

What is a Pet-Nat?

    Ever wonder what makes your wine sparkling? There are a number of different methods that producers use to create the bubbles. Champagne is made by using the Méthode Traditionelle, in which a dry, still wine gets an addition of sugar and yeast and is bottled. This causes a second fermentation inside of the bottle, thus creating bubbles. Prosecco is produced with the Charmat method, where dry, still wine gets the addition of yeast and sugar and is left in a pressure ready tank. The second fermentation happens inside of this tank, which traps all of the bubbles, and is then bottled. Another way of making sparkling wine is to pump CO2 directly into still wine to achieve a bubbling beverage. 

    But the oldest and perhaps simplest way of creating sparkling wine is the Méthode Ancestrale, or pétillant naturel (pét-nat) style. To make a pét-nat, we simply bottle a wine before it has finished fermenting. The residual sugar in the wine ferments in bottle, creating light, natural bubbles. 

    Similar to méthode traditionelle, because the wine has fermented in the bottle, we are left with sediment in the bottom as a result. By AOC rules, for Champagnes this sediment must be removed. In order to achieve this, winemakers put the bottles in riddling racks, which hold the bottles upside down, so that the yeast falls into the cap and neck of the bottle. Next, the bottleneck is frozen to trap that sediment into a plug of frozen wine. Winemakers then disgorge; they uncap the bottle and let the frozen plug fly out, leaving a clean bottle of bubbly wine left. Wine and sometimes a little sugar is then added back to the bottle before it is finally corked and caged. 

    Not all Pét-Nat wines have to go through this disgorging process, and many producers prefer not to, as they enjoy the natural style of the wine with sediment. While some may be weary of sediment and cloudiness in a wine, others enjoy the added mouthfeel and rustic character. 

    This past harvest season, we bottled a portion of our Syrah rosé before it had finished fermenting to create a pét-nat style wine. Our bottles have all fermented creating a nice bubbly wine. We’ve turned all of our bottles upside down in order to catch the sediment in the cap, and we have decided to disgorge the bottles in order to achieve a cleaner style sparkling. Soon, we will create ice baths, plunge the bottles, and have a messy day of popping bottles. This spring you will be able to enjoy our Syrah Rosé pét-nat and pop some bottles yourselves!

Time Posted: Mar 15, 2020 at 9:00 AM
Buckel Family
 
February 26, 2020 | Buckel Family

Why is my white wine cloudy?

Have you ever gone home with a clear bottle of white wine, popped it in the fridge, and then noticed crystals in the bottom of the bottle or in your glass? Those are formed by tartaric acid, which naturally occurs in grapes. These tartrate crystals can form after the wine ferments and if the wine becomes oversaturated with tartaric acid. The excess acid is suspended in the wine, and can then form crystals and drop out. These tartrate crystals are not harmful to consume, however they are not exactly desirable. 

Another issue that can arise with these wines is heat instability. A seemingly clear bottle of wine can turn hazy when exposed to higher heat. For instance, you might go to a winery and buy a nice clear bottle of white wine, and store it in your trunk while you head out for a bike ride. If it’s a summer day and your car gets hot, you could come back to find a now cloudy bottle of wine. This heat instability is due to the naturally occuring proteins in grapes, and some have significantly more than others.

In order to avoid these outcomes, we at Buckel Family Wine will put our white and rose wines through cold and heat stabilization. To cold stabilize the wine, it is as simple as cooling the wine tank down to about 30 degrees (F). The tartrate crystals will form in the tank and fall to the bottom, and deposit around the sides of the tank. To heat stabilize the wine, we use Bentonite (which is a clay substance) to bind to the proteins that can cause the cloudiness. This will also then fall to the bottom of the tank, and we are left with clean, stable wine. 

    At that point, we will be about ready to bottle the wines, just after sending them through a filtering process to ensure they are fully stable and clean wines, and that there will be no issues that arise once they are in the bottle. Our goal is to deliver wines that are expressive and natural. Therefore, we only do as much as needed to deliver quality, while making sure these wines don’t lose what makes them unique.

 

Time Posted: Feb 26, 2020 at 1:20 PM
Buckel Family
 
January 4, 2020 | Buckel Family

Colorado grapes are getting better…

Gunnison Valley, CO

Colorado grapes are getting better…

Sunset Magazine International Wine Competition 2019 awards Buckel Family Wine’s 2016 Chardonnay with gold.

With a growing Colorado presence in the wine industry, it’s great to see Colorado Wineries as well as Colorado grapes receiving national recognition. Buckel Family Wine was awarded a gold medal for their 2016 Chardonnay in the 2019 Sunset Magazine International Wine Competition. The wine was made from Chardonnay grapes grown in Palisade, CO by grower Black Bear Orchards. The competition also awarded other Colorado wineries with medals, although the grapes were sourced from outside of the state. 

The November/December issue of Sunset Magazine recognizes the best wines of the west on page 67.

About Buckel Family Wine: Buckel Family Wine was founded in 2017 by winemaker Joe Buckel and his wife Shamai. They have been getting their wines into the hands of restaurants and liquor stores throughout Colorado, with rave reviews. The winery uses 100% Colorado sourced grapes from Palisade, Hotchkiss, and Cortez vineyards. They produce the wines in Gunnison, CO, with a tasting room slated to open in February.

Buckel Family Wine believes the nuanced grape flavors should be expressed on the nose and palette profile of each wine. Buckel wines are handmade in an old world natural style, with the red wine being unfined and unfiltered.  Classical winemaking techniques are used, with minimal intervention, and no sugars or additives. Other wines being produced by Buckel Family wine include, a red blend, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir, Cinsualt, Rosé, and Sauvignon Blanc.

“Our 2016 Chardonnay is created in a Burgundian style with grapes sourced from vines planted in the 1970’s in Palisade, CO.  It is an expressive Chardonnay with a richness on the palate finishing with focused acidity,” Joe Bucke

Time Posted: Jan 4, 2020 at 10:27 AM